NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2016A-0312

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Program Information for 2016A-0312


PI: Tiffany Meshkat, CalTech-JPL, meshkat@caltech.edu
Address: California Institute of Technology, 4800 DRIVE, PASADENA, CA 91109 USA

CoI: Dimitri Mawet, California Institute of Technology
CoI: Karl Stapelfeldt, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
CoI: Sasha Hinkley, University of Exeter
CoI: Deborah Padgett, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
CoI: Isabelle Baraffe, University of Exeter
CoI: Travis Barman, U. of Arizona
CoI: Gilles Chabrier, University of Exeter
CoI: Elodie Choquet, STScI
CoI: Ji Wang, California Institute of Technology
CoI: Rebecca Jensen-Clem, California Institute of Technology
CoI: Michael McElwain, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
CoI: Farisa Morales, CalTech-JPL
CoI: Marshall Perrin, STScI

Title: Occurrence of giant planets in the dustiest new WISE debris disk systems

Abstract: Debris disks may be the signposts of recent planet formation. The dust, which is generated in collisional cascades of asteroids and comets, is enhanced by the gravitational stirring of gas giant planets. Thus bright debris disk systems are natural targets for imaging searches for planets, as it indicates that the host star likely possesses some kind of planetary system. Nearly all planets imaged to date have been found in debris disk systems: HR 8799, HD 95086, beta Pic, and 51 Eri. We propose to use the second-generation, extreme adaptive optics/coronagraphic instrument GPI to explore the dustiest debris disks recently identified by WISE (warm 22 micron excess not previously known). Our sample of 6 super-dusty targets are all young, bright, relatively nearby, early-type stars in order to maximize our chances of detecting planets. Our goal is twofold: discover the culprit(s) potentially responsible for the enormous amount of dust in these systems, and place constraints on planet formation mechanisms in debris disks. This focused mini-survey of outstanding super-dusty planetary systems will shed light on planetary evolution in the debris disk phase, and potentially contribute to new empirical relationships between planet occurrence and dust content.

Program Type: Standard/Galactic

Scheduled Nights:
Run 1 (2016A):  GEM-SQ/GPI -- 6hrs band 1 (GS-2016A-Q-15)


National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, Arizona 85726, Phone: (520) 318-8000, Fax: (520) 318-8360



NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2016A-0312

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