NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2014B-0301

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Proposal Information for 2014B-0301


PI: Tiara R. Diamond, Florida State University, trn08@my.fsu.edu
Address: Department of Physics, 77 Chieftan Way, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350, United States

CoI: Eric Y. Hsiao, Carnegie Institution of Washington (Carnegie Obs.)
CoI: Peter Hoeflich, Florida State University
CoI: Maximilian Stritzinger, Aarhus University
CoI: David Sand, Texas Tech University
CoI: G. H. Marion, University of Texas at Austin
CoI: Mark M. Phillips, Carnegie Institution of Washington (Carnegie Obs.)
CoI: Nidia Morrell, Carnegie Institution of Washington (Carnegie Obs.)
CoI: Christopher L. Gerardy, Florida State University
CoI: Robert B. Penney, Clemson University

Title: Late-time near-infrared spectroscopy of SN 2014J

Abstract: With an increasing amount of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) being discovered within hours of their estimated explosions, early time spectra in all parts of the spectrum have become available. Complementary late time spectra allow for a more complete picture of the physics going on in the progenitors and explosions of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Specifically, the emission lines during the nebular phase provide insight into distribution of burning products of the explosion, central density of the progenitor, and even magnetic fields in the progenitor star if a time sequence of observations is made. Understanding the physics of SNe Ia will make them better standard candles. SN 2014J is an extremely important object because of its proximity; at only 3.4 Mpc this is the nearest SNe Ia in forty years. Unlike the optical part of the spectrum, where the profuse amount of emission lines complicate analysis, the near-infrared (NIR) is ideal because of the well-isolated [Fe II] line at 1.64um. Another benefit is that even though the target is highly extinguished in the optical, the extinction in the near-infrared is significantly less. We propose to observe at three epochs from around 300 to 400 days past the estimated explosion date. SN 2014J will be brighter than H=16 during these observations.


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