NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2013A-0364

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Proposal Information for 2013A-0364


PI: Antonino Cucchiara, UC Santa Cruz, acucchia@ucolick.org
Address: Astronomy and Astrophysics Board of Study, Natural Sciences II, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064, USA

CoI: Stephen Cenko, UC Berkeley
CoI: Brian Schmidt, Australian National University
CoI: Daniel Perley, Caltech Astronomy
CoI: Edo Berger, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Derek Fox, Pennsylvania State University
CoI: Andrew Fruchter, Space Telescope Science Institute
CoI: Joshua Bloom, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Jason X. Prochaska, UC Santa Cruz
CoI: Sebastian Lopez, Universidad de Chile
CoI: Bethany Cobb, The George Washington University
CoI: Kathy Roth, Gemini Observatory
CoI: Andrew Levan, University of Warwick
CoI: Nial Tanvir, University of Leicester
CoI: Sharon Rapoport, Australian National University
CoI: Fang Yuan, Australian National University
CoI: Ryan Chornock, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Fong Wen-Fai, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Adam Morgan, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Klaas Wiersema, University of Leicester

Title: Exploring the first stars with rapid GRB follow-up observations

Abstract: GRBs provide a unique window on exotic, highly relativistic physics. Our discovery of cosmic explosions like GRB090423 at z=8.2, breaking the record for the most distant known object, also demonstrates the power of using GRBs as lighthouses visible into the epoch of re-ionization, pinpointing the earliest stars and galaxies. Therefore, we intend (i) to observe GRBs at very high-z, in order to explore the IGM during reionization and place fundamental constraints on the early epochs of star-formation; (ii) to study in detail the class of short-duration bursts, especially their electromagnetic signatures in relation to gravitational-wave sources; (iii) to observe exceptionally energetic bursts, such as detected by the Fermi-LAT satellite in order to test theories of quantum gravity; (iv) continue our quest for low-z GRBs associated with supernovae, which, in conjunction with a larger sample of GRB afterglow spectra will provide unique insights into the stellar progenitors and explosion sites of these intriguing phenomena. Gemini, with its flexible schedule and instrumentation suite, represents a cornerstone facility of global GRB research and we will continue to use it in combination with a large network of other facilities.


National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, Arizona 85726, Phone: (520) 318-8000, Fax: (520) 318-8360



NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2013A-0364

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