NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2012A-0241

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Proposal Information for 2012A-0241


PI: Derek Fox, Pennsylvania State University, dfox@astro.psu.edu
Address: Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA, 16802, USA

CoI: Bethany Cobb, The George Washington University
CoI: Nial Tanvir, University of Leicester
CoI: Antonino Cucchiara, UCO/Lick Observaotry
CoI: Andrew Levan, University of Warwick
CoI: Joshua Bloom, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Edo Berger, Harvard University
CoI: Brian Schmidt, Australian National University
CoI: Brad Cenko, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Kathy Roth, Gemini Observatory - North
CoI: Andrew Fruchter, Space Telescope Science Institute
CoI: Daniel Perley, Caltech
CoI: Andrew Fruchter, Space Telescope Science Institute
CoI: David Bersier, Liverpool John Moores University
CoI: Andrew Bunker, Oxford
CoI: Hsiao-Wen Chen, University of Chicago
CoI: Wen-Fai Fong, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Ryan Chornock, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Kathy Roth, Gemini Observatory
CoI: Jochen Greiner, Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
CoI: Laskar Tanmoy, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
CoI: Nat Butler, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Adam Morgan, UC Berkeley (Astronomy)
CoI: Paul O'Brien, University of Leicester
CoI: Sebastian Lopez, Universidad de Chile
CoI: Max Pettini, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge
CoI: Jason X Prochaska, UC Santa Cruz
CoI: Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, UC Santa Cruz
CoI: Rhaana Starling, University of Leicester,
CoI: Klaas Wiersema, University of Leicester
CoI: Bryan Penprase, Pomona College
CoI: Thomas de Jaeger, Universidad de Chile
CoI: Maria Jose Maureira, Yale university
CoI: Nicholas Tejos, durham University
CoI: Arne Rau, Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
CoI: John Graham, Space Telescope Science Institute
CoI: Jens Hjorth, NBI: DARK, Copenhagen
CoI: Palle Jakobsson, University of Iceland
CoI: Karl Glazebrook, Swinburne University of Technology

Title: Gamma-Ray Bursts: Progenitors, Physics, and Cosmology

Abstract: Rapid observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows are critical to probing their exotic physics and using them as probes of the Universe. Gemini-N observations led to discovery of two of the highest-redshift objects known, GRBs 090423 at z=8.2 and 090429B at z 9.4, in campaigns led by our merged collaboration. Our approach is to both study individual key events and build up statistical samples. Primary goals remain (1) To observe GRBs at z>6, where they provide luminous probes of star-forming galaxies and the evolving intergalactic medium throughout the reionization era; (2) To detect afterglows and measure redshifts for short-duration bursts, whose nature remains enigmatic; (3) To construct a more complete redshift sample of GRBs and constrain the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation using their host galaxies; and (4) To identify and observe bursts of particular interest including low-redshift GRB-supernovae, oddball events like the tidal disruption event GRB110328A/SwiftJ1644+57, and Fermi-LAT detected bursts. Gemini is a cornerstone facility of global GRB research, and we will continue to use it judiciously in combination with a large network of small telescopes and ground- and space-based facilities.


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