NOAO >   Observing Info >   Approved Programs >   2009A-0316

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Proposal Information for 2009A-0316


PI: Jennifer Andrews, Lousiana State University, jandrews@phys.lsu.edu
Address: Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, USA

CoI: Geoffrey Clayton, LSU
CoI: Mike Barlow, University College London
CoI: Ben Sugerman, Goucher College
CoI: Margaret Meixner, STScI
CoI: Doug Welch, McMaster University

Title: A Comprehensive Study of Dust Formation in Type II Supernovae with HST, Spitzer and Gemini

Abstract: We propose to continue our Gemini/GMOS imaging and spectrascopic observations of three extremely bright Type II SNe (2007it, 2007oc, 2007od) as part of a unique detailed study of dust formation of SNe at visible, near- and mid-IR wavelengths. Gemini time for semesters 2009A & 2009B has already been approved as part of a joint Hubble/NOAO Cycle 17 proposal. These new observations will be combined with already approved 2008A&B Gemini/GMOS, and Spitzer Cycle 5 (priority 1) programs. Because all three SNe were so unusually bright at discovery (V 13.5 mag), we should be able to follow their evolution at regular intervals for up to 700 days with the sensitivity of Gemini/GMOS. This is very important because dust typically condenses in the SN ejecta approximately 300-600 days after the initial explosion. Spectra and images of 2007it will be obtained five times in 2009A, at the start of the semester ( 500 days) and then at approximately 30 day intervals. 2007oc and 2007od will be observed twice in 2009A, in May ( 550 days) and then again in July ( 600 days). We have previously shown using Gemini and Spitzer that monitoring the evolution of H-alpha and [O I] emission-line profiles, g'r'i photometry, and IR emission in Type II SNe are very sensitive techniques for detecting new dust forming in the ejecta. We hope that the unique combination of coordinated Gemini, Spitzer and HST data obtained during the dust forming period will answer the perplexing questions concerning when and how much dust is produced by Type II SNe. Our radiative transfer codes will be used to model these observations, allowing us to investigate the clumpiness of dust in the ejecta and better estimate the total mass of dust. The results will have important implications for the evolution of dust-rich galaxies at high redshift (z 6) where young high-mass stars may be significant dust producers.


National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, Arizona 85726, Phone: (520) 318-8000, Fax: (520) 318-8360



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