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Who's Who Among the Kitt Peak Postdocs (1Dec95) (from KPNO, NOAO Newsletter No. 44, December 1995) KPNO has a lively post-doctoral research program as evidenced by the accompanying photograph of the postdoctoral fellows resident at KPNO for the 1995-1996 academic year. Each year KPNO is typically able to offer one or two postdoctoral appointments supported directly by NOAO funds. We are also pleased to be able to host Hubble fellows as well as a number of other researchers supported by external grants. This year we are pleased to welcome Arjun Dey to the program. Dey is an NOAO postdoc who comes to us after having completed his thesis as a student in the Department of Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley. With the start of a new year, we thought that this would be a good time to summarize the research activities of all of our postdocs. Edward Ajhar is a postdoc supported by the HST WFPC-I team, and is working with Tod Lauer on several HST programs. This work includes investigations of the diverse nature of galaxy cores as well as the globular cluster systems around elliptical galaxies in Coma and Virgo, as they relate to the distance scale and their formation history. Ajhar recently completed a color-magnitude diagram study of four M31 globular clusters to calibrate the RR Lyrae metallicity relation. He is also completing work with his former thesis advisor John Tonry and other collaborators that uses surface brightness fluctuation distances as a probe of nearby large-scale flows. Stephane Charlot is an NOAO postdoctoral fellow working on setting constraints on the formation and evolution of galaxies from their observed properties. This work includes models of stellar populations, radiative transfer, and the connection between galaxies and absorption-line systems of distant quasars. Charlot is leaving NOAO this November to take a permanent research position at the Institut d'Astrophysique du CNRS in Paris, France. Michael Corbin is supported by the HST Archive program, and is working with Todd Boroson on the analysis of the combined UV and optical spectra of a sample of low-redshift QSOs, using HST, IUE, and ground-based spectra. Also in collaboration with Boroson, Corbin is completing a spectroscopic survey of all bright low-redshift QSOs in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These data will be used to compare the emission lines of radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and to test unified models of the former. Stephane Courteau is an NOAO postdoctoral fellow conducting research on large-scale structure in the Universe and determination of cosmological parameters. He also works on determining the mass distribution, dust content, stellar population, and formation scenarios for spiral galaxies. Courteau's recent work includes a self-consistent analysis of existing Tully-Fisher redshift-distance samples that confirms the existence of cosmic bulk flows on large-scales. He is also developing new techniques to apply the Tully-Fisher distance indicator at high redshifts. Arjun Dey is an NOAO postdoctoral fellow whose primary research interests are the evolution of galaxies and AGN, and observational cosmology. His current research is focused on understanding the physical properties of the highest redshift radio galaxies and quasars with the aim of utilizing these luminous objects as cosmological probes. In addition, Dey and his collaborators are studying the stellar content and ages of distant (z ~ 1-2) elliptical galaxies. He is also working on observational tests of AGN unification models. This work includes studying the importance of dust in distant, powerful AGN. Beatrice Mueller is a postdoc supported by the Galileo mission and a grant from the Swiss Science Foundation (until the end of 1995). She is working with Mike Belton (PI of the Galileo imaging team) on the Galileo Solid-State Imager data. Mueller is also conducting observational programs for investigating cometary rotation, evolution of cometary activity, and the link between asteroids and comets. Nalin Samarasinha is a postdoc supported by NASA working on complex rotational states of comets, long-term evolution of cometary rotational states, non-gravitational forces, and modeling of comae of different comets. Samarasinha's work performed during the last year includes explaining the complex rotation and near-constant non-gravitational effects of comet Halley, plausible rotational states of the Rosetta mission target 46P/Wirtanen and implication for the mission, and trying to understand the dust coma of 95P/Chiron and the cyanogen coma of 1P/Halley. Ata Sarajedini is a Hubble Fellow conducting research on the stellar populations of the Local Group. In particular, he is trying to understand the formation and evolution of the Local Group by studying the ages and abundances of the globular clusters in its member galaxies. In addition, he is studying the stellar populations of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group and comparing them with those of the globular clusters. Sarajedini has devised and refined a number of methods that allow more precise determinations of cluster ages, reddenings, and metallicities. Paola Sartoretti is supported partly by the Galileo imaging team through KPNO staff member Mike Belton and partly by the Space Telescope Science Institute through staff member Robert Brown. She is studying, through HST imaging data, the dynamic and the vertical structure of Jupiter's atmosphere, with particular attention to the regions that are expected to be sounded by the Galileo atmospheric probe. Sartoretti is also analyzing HST I-band images of a sample of weak T-Tauri stars in searching for planetary companions. Ted von Hippel is a long-term visitor at NOAO from the University of Wisconsin, where he is the McKinney Assistant Scientist. He supports Wisconsin observers at the newly operational WIYN Telescope. His areas of research are stellar populations and the age question, with particular emphasis on using White Dwarfs as chronometers, both in the Galactic disk and in open clusters. Von Hippel also works on the automated classification of stellar spectra. [Photo not included] These are the postdoctoral fellows resident at KPNO for the 1995-1996 academic year. Moving from left to right, they are: Nalin Samarasinha, Stephane Charlot, Stephane Courteau, Michael Corbin, Ata Sarajedini, Edward Ajhar, Beatrice Mueller, Paola Sartoretti, Arjun Dey (rear), and Ted von Hippel. Tod Lauer
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