Summaries from articles in The Journal of American Indian Education

Inservice Activity that Emphasizes the Importance of the Culture in Teaching School Science (Haukoos & LeBeau, 1992)
From the Journal of American Indian Education talks about the reasons for incorporating Indian culture into science teaching, and describes an inservice teacher institute that encouraged teachers to use engaging and culturally relevant practices in the classroom. The follow-up is found in Importance of American Indian Culture in Teaching School Science: A Follow-Up Study (Haukoos, Bordeaux, LeBeau & Gunhammer, 1995), in which it is found that teachers regressed to their former teacher-centered, non-integrated practices after several years of teaching.
SURVEY OF AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE STUDENTS: PERCEPTIONS TOWARD THEIR STUDY SKILLS/COLLEGE LIFE, John J. Hoover; Cecelia C. Jacobs
This study assesses American Indian college student's perceptions toward four areas critical to the successful completion of college. These include perceptions toward: (1) high school preparation; (2) quality of college course instruction; (3) personal views toward attending college; and (4) study skill abilities.
THE STYLES OF LEARNING ARE DIFFERENT, BUT THE TEACHING IS JUST THE SAME: SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHERS OF AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTH Karen Swisher and Donna Deyhle 1989
Examines learning style and interactional style differences of American Indian and Alaskan Native students. Provides specific classroom examples and research findings concerning culturally influenced learning styles, the visual approach to learning, field dependence, public vs. private demonstration of learning, and cooperation versus competition in the classroom.
Science for the Native Orientated Classrom (Smith, 1982)
Discusses the match between the Western scientific processes and their match to Native processes.

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