Useful books:

education and teaching

“Collected Wisdom: American Indian Education” L. Cleary & T. Peacock (1997) ISBN 0205267572
A very comprehensive review of the many problems facing American Indian students. Each chapter ends with summary points. (See example above) While the interested reader should read the entire book, each chapter ends with a concise list of salient points.
The Journal of Educational Issues of Language Minority Students, no longer on the web, has various articles, including. AMERICAN INDIAN LEARNING STYLES SURVEY: AN ASSESSMENT OF TEACHERS KNOWLEDGE Karen Swisher, v. 13 pp. 59-77, Spring 1994

(abstract)
The references in the literature are both speculative and empirical in nature; nonetheless, the cooperative approach is viewed as an attribute of American Indian children, so it was not surprising that a great deal of agreement existed on this value. Families, especially extended families, are often spoken of as the central segment of many American Indian societies; apparently the respondents concur with this notion.

Many American Indian children are deliberate in their responses and do not respond rapidly to questions; they often sense the impatience of their teachers who do not understand this value. ...

The values of careful listening and careful observation reflect a belief held by many American Indians that it is virtuous to be a good listener and to learn as much as one can from studying the environment, including the messages that are transmitted by nonverbal behavior.

The quiet (or silent) American Indian child once was (and in some cases continues to be) a stereotyped picture of an American Indian child reluctant to speak up or volunteer information in a typical classroom. Depending on cultural ties and individual personality, this phenomenon might still occur; however, it is not an assumption one should make. In fact, teachers are often surprised when American Indian children are openly verbal, inquisitive, and curious because they believe the reticence attributed to American Indian children to be general in nature

astronomy and the sky

“Stars of the First People, Native American Star Myths and Constellations”, D. Miller

“Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children” M.J. Caduto & J. Bruchas

A resource guide to multicultural astronomy that includes a listing of books related to Native American sky lore is available at: www.astrosociety.org/education/resources/multi.html