2007 Fall Meeting Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2007), Title, Eos Trans. AGU,
88
(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx

HR: 0800h
AN: ED21A-0083
TI: Impact of Including Authentic Inquiry Experiences in Methods Courses for Pre-Service Secondary Teachers
AU: Slater, T F
EM: tslater@as.arizona.edu
AF: University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States
AU: Elfring, L
EM: elfring@u.arizona.edu
AF: University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States
AU: Novodvorsky, I
EM: novod@u.arizona.edu
AF: University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States
AU: Talanquer, V
EM: vicente@u.arizona.edu
AF: University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States
AU: * Quintenz, J
EM: quintenz@u.arizona.edu
AF: University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States
AB: Science education reform documents universally call for students to have authentic and meaningful experiences using real data in the context of their science education. The underlying philosophical position is that students analyzing data can have experiences that mimic actual research. In short, research experiences that reflect the scientific spirit of inquiry potentially can: prepare students to address real world complex problems; develop students' ability to use scientific methods; prepare students to critically evaluate the validity of data or evidence and of the consequent interpretations or conclusions; teach quantitative skills, technical methods, and scientific concepts; increase verbal, written, and graphical communication skills; and train students in the values and ethics of working with scientific data. However, it is unclear what the broader pre-service teacher preparation community is doing in preparing future teachers to promote, manage, and successful facilitate their own students in conducting authentic scientific inquiry. Surveys of undergraduates in secondary science education programs suggests that students have had almost no experiences themselves in conducting open scientific inquiry where they develop researchable questions, design strategies to pursue evidence, and communicate data-based conclusions. In response, the College of Science Teacher Preparation Program at the University of Arizona requires all students enrolled in its various science teaching methods courses to complete an open inquiry research project and defend their findings at a specially designed inquiry science mini-conference at the end of the term. End-of-term surveys show that students enjoy their research experience and believe that this experience enhances their ability to facilitate their own future students in conducting open inquiry.
UR: http://cos.arizona.edu/sci_undergraduate_info/majors_sci_teacher.asp
DE: 0800 EDUCATION
SC: Education and Human Resources [ED]
MN: 2007 Fall Meeting